Space1970

As a child of the 70’s, I grew up watching all sorts of weird attempts at Science Fiction, from Battlestar Galactica to Space 1999. Now Christopher Mills has set up an amazing blog dedicated entirely to 1970’s Science Fiction in all its forms!

This blog is dedicated to the science fiction films and television series of the 1970s – give or take a few years (say, 1969-1983) – including such nostalgic favorites as Star Wars, Space: 1999, UFO, Space Academy, the original Battlestar Galactica, Jason of Star Command, Buck Rogers in the 25th Century, Logan’s Run and many others.

But be warned: I still love these productions with all the enthusiasm I held for them as a kid, and they will be treated here with affection and respect. If you’re looking for someone to snarkily denigrate “old” movies – or like to do that yourself – you’ve come to the wrong site.

So journey with us back to the days when special effects were created by skillful hands and spaceships were detailed models, when robots were obligatory comedy relief, when square-jawed heroes and cloaked villains battled among the stars — and the future was fun!

So check out Space1970!

Productivity Hunt- Google Drive

Taking a little tip from Terry Mixon of the Dead Robots’ Society podcast with my newest writing project, I’m going to use Google Drive (aka Google Docs) for my writing this time. With it, I can write on my desktop, laptop, iPhone, or whatever computer I happen to be sitting at that can access the net and it’s all synced constantly into one document. The idea will be to harness all those downtime moments like lunch hours, killing time between classes and waiting in the doctor’s office and use them for writing time. I’ll report back on how it goes!

Rob

The Gate Short Film – YouTube

Nifty short amateur sci-fi film. Excellent FX work.

“The Perfect Match” by Ken Liu

A nifty short story about social media like Facebook, and where it’s all headed. Definitely worth the read:

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“I thought I told you I didn’t want that thing installed,” she said as he stepped out of his apartment. Her voice was garbled through some kind of electronic filter. In response to his questioning look, she gestured to the camera over Sai’s door.

Talking to Jenny was like talking to one of his grandmother’s friends who refused to use Centillion email or get a ShareAll account because they were afraid of having “the computer” know “all their business”-except that as far as he could tell, Jenny was his age. She had grown up a digital native, but somehow had missed the ethos of sharing.

“Jenny, I’m not going to argue with you. I have a right to install anything I want over my door. And I want Tilly to keep an eye on my door when I’m away. Apartment 308 was just burglarized last week.”

“But your camera will record visitors to my place, too, because we share this hallway.”

“So?”

“I don’t want Tilly to have any of my social graph.”

Sai rolled his eyes. “What do you have to hide?”

“That’s not the point-”

“Yeah, yeah, civil liberties, freedom, privacy, blah blah blah . . . ”

Sai was sick of arguing with people like Jenny. He had made the same point countless times: Centillion is not some big scary government. It’s a private company, whose motto happens to be “Make things better!” Just because you want to live in the dark ages doesn’t mean the rest of us shouldn’t enjoy the benefits of ubiquitous computing.

He dodged around her bulky frame to get to the stairs.

“Tilly doesn’t just tell you what you want,” Jenny shouted. “She tells you what to think. Do you even know what you really want any more?”

Sai paused for a moment.

“Do you?” she pressed.

via Lightspeed Presents . . . Presents… “The Perfect Match” by Ken Liu.

A “lost” Kaiju Film- Toho-Hammer’s Nessie Movie

This would have blown my 12 year old mind!

By 1976, the legendary Hammer Films had a script for a new big budget horror film entitled “Nessie” starring the British Isles’ favorite kelpie cryptid. It seemed as though the Loch Ness Monster would finally earn respect as the star of her own horror film. It also didn’t hurt that “Jaws” was still on the minds of every moviegoer whenever they went near any large body of water.

The project would have been a huge undertaking, a joint production of Hammer Films, Columbia Pictures, and David Frost’s Paradine Productions. The special effects sequences were to be courtesy of Toho Co., Ltd., the studio responsible for Godzilla, Rodan, Mothra, King Ghidora, and numerous other giant monsters. The pairing of Hammer and Toho on the project seemed like any fantasy film fan’s dream come true, while Columbia gave the venture an air of mainstream respectability. Even though Hammer’s pedigree gave the project credibility with horror film buffs, the sad truth was that Hammer’s golden age was over and they were in dire financial trouble. Thanks to Columbia and Paradine, an initial budget of four million dollars was earmarked for the project. After a few other aborted productions such as “Vampirella”, this film was to be Hammer’s saving grace.

Continued at Cryptomundo » Toho-Hammer Nessie Movie.