Creative Experiments- KFAT Historical Flash Fiction

Hi All,

Last week over on the KFAT site, my first weekly webfiction story The Inuyama Rebellion posted its final chapter. It’s been a fun run, and I have to say I’ve enjoyed the experiment of writing a weekly piece of fiction in addition to my other writing projects. Of course, I also got a huge kick out of it, since my friend Brushmen was doing great fan art to go with each weekly chapter. (If you haven’t checked them out, then definitely do so.)

Having enjoyed the process, I’ve decided to continue my little experiment, but to get even more…experimental.

For the next nine Mondays (the first one went up already) I will be posting a single flash fiction (1000 words or less) story each week on the KFAT site. These are a little series I call “The Fox Cycle”, and are me doing a little challenge with myself. Each story will be different, and self-contained, but each story will also connect up with all the others to tell a larger story. All of them are historical fiction, take place around the year 1700, and are what you could call an exercise in both character and world building.

What characters and world? Ah, Mes Amis! That would be telling!

I’ve rarely written flash fiction before, so this will be a real challenge in keep my writing tight and using different styles and techniques to bring across a story in the best possible ways. There’s also an additional level to the experiment, but I’ll explain that once the whole story cycle is finished.

Enjoy!
Rob

Samurai Horses

As someone into Japanese history, I always wondered something- why didn’t the Japanese make more extensive use of horses during their wars? I knew they made some use of them, but nowhere near as much as people from other countries did.

Since there’s a horse element to this week’s part (and the coming parts) of my story “The Inuyama Rebellion” I thought I’d look up something on Japanese horses of the Sengoku (Warring States) period.

What I didn’t expect to find was the reason why Horses weren’t used much in Japan by the Samurai the way they were in many other parts of the world. They used them, but only in fairly small numbers, and I’d always wondered why. Well apparently the answer is that Japanese native horses are actually pretty small.

Text: Thoroughbred/Japanese Horse

This meant that they had a very limited ability to carry a Japanese Samurai (much less one in full armour) for long distances and thus were apparently only used by commanders and messengers in war. The Japanese apparently didn’t even bother to have actual mounted cavalry units per-se.

Here are pictures of Samurai and horses for comparison-

 

The last picture (painting, really) shows a clear-ish view of what a saddle of the period looked like too. (And this is likely the style of saddle Masato would be using in the story.)

Rob

Mar 11, 2011: Japanese tsunami from the point of view of a car.

The experience of the Earthquake and following Tsunami from the point of view of a dashboard camera, you can even hear all the sounds as well. (Although luckily, it doesn’t include any human sounds like the car owner dying, I’m pretty sure the car is empty for most of the video.) What a harrowing experience just watching it, much less living it. You can see why it’s amazing so many people lived!

How To Use A Samurai Sword Properly ~ www.popgive.com

For those writing Samurai fiction, here’s a treasure trove of detail!

Each school will have different variations of angles, grips and body positions, but here is a fundamental cutting concept that most sword styles share: When delivering a cut, make sure that your wrists are lined up behind the blade handle. It may feel fine in the air, but when you actually cut into something, you’re in for a big surprise when you loose control of your sword.

How To Use A Samurai Sword Properly ~ www.popgive.com.

Live Action Ranma 1/2 Special will Air in December!

Akane Tendo

Apparently someone had decided to do a Live-Action Ranma 1/2 show in Japan, probably out of a mix of nostalgia and lack of ideas. I used to be a big Ranma 1/2 fan once upon a time, until it turned into an endless boring repetition of the same jokes and ideas, but it does have a great cast and fun core premise, so I look forward to seeing what they do with this. The actors look great for their roles, and I will definitely give this a look!

More information can be found here and more cast pictures here.

 

Boy-Type Ranma

Girl-Type Ranma

 

Mr. Tendo!

The Inuyama Rebellion- Part Thirteen | Kung Fu Action Theatre

 

In another part of the forest, a group of Kurokawa samurai in the command of the guard captain of the summer residence came upon their lord. He was sitting on a rock at the side of the road, and when he made no motion to even indicate he knew they were there, the guard captain dismounted and quickly marched over to kneel before him.

“My lord. Thank the heavens you’re safe!”

“No thanks to you, Captain.” The daimyo declared in a cold angry voice, not even looking at the men. “You will atone for your mistake by the morning, I trust?”

The Inuyama Rebellion- Part Thirteen | Kung Fu Action Theatre.

Webcomic- Teach English in Japan

Ahh, memories. ^_^ This is very similar how I ended up teaching in Japan the first time. A call, an easy interview, a few goodbye parties, and bang…off on the plane into a whole new world!

The comic itself is pretty good, give it a read if you’re interested in seeing how it goes…And it really does go like this…

Teach English in Japan – Page 1.

The Inuyama Rebellion- Part Eleven

The torches which lined the courtyard of the Kurokawa clan’s summer residence had been lit and a small stage had been erected. Upon it the great lord of the Kurokawa sat on a stool in resplendent robes fanning himself casually from the heat of the summer evening. His vassals and lords were gathered around him as though prepared for an audience, or a trial. Nearby, a number of servants stood, gossiping quietly- waiting to see what would happen next. Read More

A History of Japanese Clothing and Accessories

Link

A History of Japanese Clothing and Accessories is another great site for learning about the clothes worn by people throughout Japan’s history. Includes lots of images.